• STRENGTHENING WATER STEWARDSHIP IN AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY STANDARDS May 2015
    HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
    The goal of this study is to assess and better understand how agricultural com- modity standards currently address the challenges of freshwater conservation through water stewardship practices, and to provide constructive solutions to strengthen water stewardship approaches. Simply put, the study seeks to provide a roadmap for agricultural sustainability standards to more comprehensively address the water risks of their users.
    The full report here

  • RIPE FOR ABUSE April 2015
    HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
    This 74-page report documents that children as young as 11 work on some settlement farms, often in high temperatures. The children carry heavy loads, are exposed to hazardous pesticides, and in some cases have to pay themselves for medical treatment for work-related injuries or illness.
    The full report here

  • OUR PUBLIC WATER FUTURE April 2015
    TNI (Transnational Institute of Policy studies)
    TNI has joined with a number of organisations to launch Our public water future: The global experience with remunicipalisation that details the growing wave of cities and communities worldwide that are bringing water services back under public control. The book is launched in the run-up to the World Water Forum in South Korea (12-17 April) and comes in the wake of Jakarta’s decision in March 2015 to annul its privatised water contracts citing the violation of the 9.9 million residents’ human right to water.
    The full book here

  • URBAN WATER CHALLENGES IN THE AMERICAS. A PERSPECTIVE FROM THE ACADEMIES OF SCIENCES March 2015
    IANAS
    The 682 page volume includes chapters evaluating urban water issues for 20 countries of the Americas.The book, which had 120 contributing authors, is available in both English and Spanish.The Cuban chapter “Singularities of Island Aquifer Management in the HumidTropics: the urban water cycle in Havana, Cuba” was written by Leslie Molerio, Ma. Isabel González and E. Planos with the Editorial Coordination of Dr. M. Arellano. It is a pleasure to share it with you all. The publication can be downloaded for free at the IANAS web site.
    The full book here

  • WATER AT THE HEART OF EL SALVADOR’S STRUGGLE AGAINST NEOLIBERALISM March 2015
    BLUE PLANET PROJECT
    This paper examines three national-level strategies championed by social movement coalitions in El Salvador in order to address the freshwater crisis by challenging its systemic causes. These strategies include: a national ban on metal mining, a constitutional amendment recognizing the human right to water, and a general water law that legally establishes social control of water resources and services. These strategies are aimed, in part, at balancing power by strengthening the sovereignty of the Salvadoran people to determine their own freshwater future.
    The full report here

  • WORLD WATER DEVELOPMENT REPORT, March 2015
    UNITED NATIONS
    Water is at the core of sustainable development. Water resources, and the range of services they provide, underpin poverty reduction, economic growth and environmental sustainability. From food and energy security to human
    and environmental health, water contributes to improvements in social wellbeing and inclusive growth, affecting the livelihoods of billions.
    The full report here

  • STOP ECOENERGY’S LAND GRAB IN BAGAMOYO-TANZANIA, March 2015
    ACTION AID
    Rural communities in the Bagamoyo district of Tanzania are opposing a much-lauded sugar cane plantation project planned by EcoEnergy, a Swedish-owned company that has secured a lease of over 20,000 hectares of land for the next 99 years and which is about to push smallholder producers off their land.
    The full report here

  • TRADING AWAY PUBLIC WATER, TRADE NEGOTIATION AND WATER SERVICE, January 2015
    FOOD&WATER EUROPE
    Citizens have resisted several waves to privatise water management in the European Union (EU). Even as we are still resisting the last one, pushed by the European Commission through the Troika (together with the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund), we are facing another huge risk from new trade agreements that the EU is negotiating at a multilateral scale.
    The full report here

  • HUMAN RIGHTS IN INVESTOR-STATE ARBITRATION: THE HUMAN RIGHT TO WATER AND BEYOND, January 2015
    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
    This article analyzes the restrictive approach adopted by investor-State arbitration tribunals to human rights arguments raised by host States, as exemplified in the case of the human right to water, and examines the potential implications of this approach for the international human rights regime and the legitimacy of investment arbitration.
    The full report here

  • TOXIC WATER, TAINTED JUSTICE, December 2014
    HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
    This 32-page report describes 16 years of failure by Thailand’s Pollution Control Department and public health authorities to prevent further exposure to lead among the village’s ethnic Karen residents.
    The full report here

  • WATER FOOTPRINT BENCHMARKS FOR CROP PRODUCTION: A FIRST GLOBAL ASSESSMENT, December 2014
    TWENTE WATER CENTER
    In the coming few decades, global freshwater demand will increase to meet the growing demand for food, fibre and biofuel crops. Raising water productivity in agriculture, that is reducing the water footprint (WF) per unit of production, will contribute to reducing the pressure on the limited global freshwater resources. This study establishes a set of global WF benchmark values for a large number of crops grown in the world.
    The full report here

  • ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF AGRICULTURAL WATER USE IN FAMILY FARMING, December 2014
    COORDINATION SUD
    The group has put a stop to common misconceptions, stressing that not all peasants waste water ! On the contrary, peasant farming around the world involves traditional collective and individual know how with a proven track record in terms of the sustainable management of water for the benefit of the community. This knowledge and these practices ought to be recognized and promoted, in the face of the capital-intensive and often water-intensive farming model that dominates debates and influences policy.

    The full report here

  • HERE TO STAY: WATER MUNICIPALISATION AS A GLOBAL TREND, November 2014
    TNI (Transnational Institute of Policy studies)
    Cities, regions and countries are increasingly choosing to close the book on water privatisation and to “remunicipalise” services by taking back public control over water and sanitation management. This paper looks at the growing remunicipalisation of water supply and sanitation services as an emerging global trend and presents the most  complete overview of cases so far.
    The full report here

  • THE GLOBAL OCEAN GRAB: A PRIMER, September 2014
    TNI (Transnational Institute of Policy studies)
    The term ‘ocean grabbing’ aims to cast new light on important processes and dynamics that are negatively affecting the people and communities whose way of life, cultural identity and livelihoods depend on their involvement in small-scale fishing and closely related activities.
    The full report here

  • THE URGENT CASE FOR A BAN ON FRACKING, September 2014
    FOOD AND WATER WATCH
    Today, the term “fracking” represents the host of problems that this dangerous practice entails. This report details evidence on the many reasons why fracking should be banned, including: producing massive volumes of toxic and radioactive waste; pumping hazardous pollutants into the air; destabilizing the climate; disrupting local communities; turning homes into explosive hazards; causing thousands of accidents, leaks and spills.
    The full report here

  • THE GLOBAL WATER GRAB: A PRIMER, March 2014
    TNI (Transnational Institute of Policy studies)
    Water grabbing refers to situations where powerful actors take control of valuable water resources  for their own benefit, depriving local communities whose livelihoods often depend on these resources and ecosystems.
    The full report here

  • THIRSTY COAL, July 2013
    GREENPEACE EAST-ASIA
    This investigation report is a follow-up to the 2012 Greenpeace and the China Academy of Sciences joint study: Thirsty Coal: A Water Crisis Exacerbated By China’s New Mega Coal Bases. In this report, we focus on the most controversial part of Chinas coal strategy: the proposed scaling up of the coal chemical sector.
    The full report here

  • SMALLHOLDER IRRIGATORS, WATER RIGHTS AND INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE: THREE CASES FROM RURAL MOZAMBIQUE, February 2013
    WATER ALTERNATIVES
    In the context of the prevalent neo-liberal discourse on rural development through improved markets, involvement of companies and a strong reliance on foreign investors this article examines the vulnerable position of smallholder irrigators and their water rights. Through the parallel analysis of three contrasting cases of smallholder irrigation in Mozambique and a comparison with formal Mozambican law, it is shown that a big gap exists between formal water rights and water rights in practice.
    The full report here

  • THIRSTY COAL: A WATER EXACERBATE, Agoust 2012
    GREENPEACE EAST ASIA
    Coal mining is an extremely water-intensive industry, as are coal-fired power plants and coal chemical industries. Through Greenpeace commissioned research, it is estimated that water demand created by this energy strategy will reach at least 9.975 billion m3 in 2015 – equivalent to one sixth of theannual total water volume of the Yellow River during a normal year. The study also estimates that in 2015, the water demand of coal power bases  will either severely challenge or exceed the respective areas’ total industrial water supply capacity.
    The full report here

  • LAND AND WATER GRABBING IN AN EAST AFRICAN COASTAL WETLAND: THE CASE OF THE TANA DELTA, June 2012
    WATER ALTERNATIVES
    The delta of the Tana river in Kenya, an important wetland in Eastern Africa, is at a major turning point. Key decisions regarding its future are on the verge of being made, some of which may dramatically alter its characteristics.  We focus on two case studies: a planned large-scale sugar cane plantation in the central floodplain and a large-scale Jatropha curcas plantation on the floodplain terraces.
    The full report here

  • THE WATER CONNECTION: IRRIGATION, WATER GRABBING AND POLITICS IN SOUTHERN MOROCCO, June 2012
    WATER ALTERNATIVES
    Water and land grabbing is often an indication of growing control by an elite group over natural resources for agricultural production, marginalising their previous users. In Southern Morocco’s Souss valley, the overuse of water resources is causing aquifer levels to sink and agricultural land to be abandoned.  On the basis of the case study, we show that water conflicts are as much struggles over political influence as over the resource itself and, consequently, that the related phenomenon of ‘water grabbing’ is not only driven by economic interests but also determined by a political agenda of regime stability and economic control.
    The full report here

  • SQUEEZING AFRICA DRY: BEHIND EVERY LAND GRAB IA WATER GRAB, June 2012
    GRAIN
    Food cannot be grown without water. In Africa, one in three people endure water scarcity and climate change will make things worse.  GRAIN looks behind the current scramble for land in Africa to reveal a global struggle for what is increasingly seen as a commodity more precious than gold or oil: water.
    The full report here

  • GLOBAL MONTHLY WATER SCARCITY: BLUE WATER FOOTPRINTS VERSUS BLUE WATER AVAILABILITY, February 2012
    WATER FOOTPRINT NETWORK
    Freshwater scarcity is a growing concern, placing considerable importance on the accuracy of indicators used to characterize and map water scarcity worldwide. We improve upon past efforts by using estimates of blue water footprints (consumptive use of ground- and surface water flows) rather than water withdrawals, accounting for the flows needed to sustain critical ecological functions and by considering monthly rather than annual values.
    The full report here

  • ARE LAND DEALS LEADING ‘WATER GRABS’?, November 2011
    INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
    Investors in land often look for land with a high growing potential, which means land with lots of rainfall or land that can be irrigated.  Water managers must seriously consider the extent to which water rights should be linked to land in this way before setting a long-term precedent that could compromise sustainable and equitable supply to all users in the future.
    The full report here

  • CONFLICT AND COOPERATION IN LOCAL WATER GOVERNANCE – INVENTORY OF LOCAL WATER-RELATED EVENTS IN DOUENTZA DISTRICT, MALI 2010
    DANISH INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
    The lack of such knowledge jeopardizes current initiatives taken in many developing countries to ensure a more efficient and equitable water governance. To fill this gap, the Competing for Water research programme developed a conceptual and methodological framework for developing comprehensive inventories of local water-related conflict and cooperation. This report documents the results of applying this framework in Douentza district, Mopti Region, Mali, and discusses the implications.
    The full report here

  • CONFLICT AND COOPERATION IN LOCAL WATER GOVERNANCE – INVENTORY OF LOCAL WATER-RELATED EVENTS IN TIRAQUE DISTRICT, BOLIVIA 2010
    DANISH INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
    The lack of such knowledge jeopardizes current initiatives taken in many developing countries to ensure a more efficient and equitable water governance. To fill this gap, the Competing for Water research programme developed a conceptual and methodological framework for developing comprehensive inventories of local water-related conflict and cooperation. This report documents the results of applying this framework in Tiraque district, Cochabamba, Bolivia, and discusses the implications.
    The full report here

  • CONFLICT AND COOPERATION IN LOCAL WATER GOVERNANCE – INVENTORY OF LOCAL WATER-RELATED EVENTS IN CON CUONG DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, VIETNAM 2010
    DANISH INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
    The lack of such knowledge jeopardizes current initiatives taken in many developing countries to ensure a more efficient and equitable water governance. To fill this gap, the Competing for Water research programme developed a conceptual and methodological framework for developing comprehensive inventories of local water-related conflict and cooperation. This report documents the results of applying this framework Con Cuong District, Nghe An Province, Vietnam, and discusses the implications.
    The full report here

  • WATER AND MINING CONFLICTS IN PERU’, November 2008
    MOUNTAIN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
    Impacts on water quality and quantity are among the most contentious aspects of mining projects. We report on one mine site in Peru where water has become a particularly conflictive issue. We then provide a detailed proposal for a monitoring plan to recover trust among stakeholders.
    The full report here